Perrysburg Sculpture Walk 2022-2023

Sixteen sculptures will be installed for one year (August 2022 through August 2023) on the perimeter and entry area of Woodlands Park in Perrysburg, Ohio.
The park setting is a beautiful backdrop for the sculptures, and the exhibit will complement the many activities that take place in the park. 
It serves as a walking destination in the mild months and a driving destination in the colder months, exemplifying the way art affects the urban setting as the seasons add distinct visual richness to the display.
The Perrysburg Sculpture Walk will serve as a catalyst to impact, inform, and educate our community and visitors about the value of public art and give recognition to local, regional, and national artists. 

We hope your visit to the

Perrysburg Sculpture Walk

entertains and engages you!

Enhance Your Exhibit Experience

In your App Store, download the free Otocast app to your smart phone or tablet, search “Perrysburg” then click on the PERRYSBURG SCULPTURE WALK, and let the artists personally lead you through their vision while you stroll the exhibit. This app is Apple and Android-friendly.

Visit Perrysburg proudly funds the Perrysburg Sculpture Walk, a paid partnership with Main Art-ery for curation & coordination efforts, as well as great appreciation for the following sponsor/in-kind partnerships that make the 2-year Sculpture Exhibit a reality:

City of Perrysburg – installation and ongoing site/electricity maintenance, telehandler installation assistance

Cultural Arts Fund of Wood County – October 1st Artist Awards Reception sponsorship

Big Daddy Graphics – gratis for Sculpture Walk brochure and map layout

Southeastern Equipment Company – assistance in installation and de-installation of exhibit pieces

Welch Publishing – gratis for Sculpture Walk news coverage and articles pertaining to the Exhibit

 

Many Thanks for supporting the Arts in Perrysburg!

Enjoy the 2022-23 Sculptures

'My Pi'

“Sculpture is an on-the-street experience with art.  It excites intuition to explore and, with power and audacity, challenges our right to take up space.  By proximity, outdoor sculpture confronts, creates dialogue, and educates.” 

-John Adduci (Chicago, Illinois)

Medium: Aluminum

‘When a Man’s an Empty Kettle’

The sculptures title is taken from a line in the Harold Arlen song from the film The Wizard of Oz. I have been fascinated with the film since childhood and this is the second sculpture I have created that pays tribute to this experience. 

-Andrew Arvanetes (Kankakee, Illinois)

Medium: Painted Aluminum

'Drop'

Drop is an award-winning sculpture utilizing height, reflection and a familiar experience of watching drop of dew or water from a blade of nature.  The sculpture is 12 feet tall giving the viewer a unique perspective of the clear drop created from cast urethane.

-John E. Bannon (Chicago, Illinois)

Medium Painted Steel, Cast urethane

‘Morning Glory Whisper Bench’

“Art is a physical manifestation of an idea or event that calls forth an emotional response from the viewer. It speaks to us and evokes a chord deep within us. Good art challenges us, can make us feel righteous, moves us, soothes us and can bring us peace.”

-Jim Gallucci (Greensboro, North Carolina)

Medium: Painted steel

‘Going Green’

“Going Green was made as a response to the destruction of our world. Humans have a terrible track record of ravaging the environment.   I wanted to make a figure that acted as a counter to that fact. Making a figure large enough to actually hug the globe stands as a metaphor for the responsibility we have to care for our home and protect it and the people there.”

-Jack Howard-Potter (Long Island City, New York)

Medium: Steel

‘Mahatma Gandhi’

This sculpture pays tribute to Mahatma Gandhi and calls attention to the historic salt march he led in 1930 when Gandhi began to peacefully rid India of British control.  Marching 241 miles to the Arabian Sea salt marshes, he and his followers collected salt, defying laws that forced Indians to obtain their necessary but highly taxed salt only from the British monopoly.  The beginning of many non-violent protests that eventually led to Indian Independence and later inspired Martin Luther King. 

-James Havens (Woodville, Ohio)

Medium: Bronze, Sandstone base

‘Oak Leaf Arch II’

“Art is a physical manifestation of an idea or event that calls forth an emotional response from the viewer. It speaks to us and evokes a chord deep within us. Good art challenges us, can make us feel righteous, moves us, soothes us and can bring us peace.”

-Jim Gallucci (Greensboro, North Carolina)

Medium: Corten steel

‘Inverted Negative Arch’

“I have always had a fascination with buildings and bridges, as well as, the columns, posts, beams and arches that support them. I come to this world from a tradition of craftsmanship. I prefer to use materials that convey strength. I have always felt that good art should be well made and that there is no excuse for poor craftsmanship.

I see each sculpture as a ‘clean sheet of paper’ that presents new opportunities to discover solutions. Beyond content and suitability, my sculpture concentrates on the fundamental issues of form and how negative space defines it, as well as, the techniques employed to create it.”

-Ken Thompson (Blissfield, Michigan)

Medium: Fabricated steel

‘King of Hearts’

“The inspiration for this large sculpture came to me during the Black Lives Matters movement. I felt a personal calling to research and design a piece that personifies the beauty of black American men and women. The original concept began with a black female made figure in a contemporary form. I created both a male and female form with a focus on the simple heart shape made by our arms coming together in a casual way when our hands are clasped together in front. This sculpture was designed without movement or energy to represent a quiet and calm shape. The base of the sculpture is shaped like the Adinkra (African) symbol representing peacemaking.”

-Carrie Fischer (Crystal Lake, Illinois)

Medium: Concrete and Steel

‘Blue Dogs’

Mark Chatterley, of Williamston Michigan has an MFA from Michigan State University and is a nationally and internationally recognized artist.  His figurative work is distinguished by his use of clay as an outdoor sculpture medium.  His high-fire technique creates a hard metal-like surface that can withstand harsh outdoor weather conditions.  The artist built a kiln big enough to handle his larger-than-life figurative works.  In addition to the kiln capacity, he developed his own glaze he calls crater glaze that can withstand the high-fire process.  His sculptures can be found in museums, outdoor exhibits, and galleries throughout the country and in permanent collections both nationally and internationally.

-Mark Chatterley (Williamston, Michigan)

Medium: Clay

‘Low-Poly Open Heart (R.I.D.E.)’

m.l.duffy was born on Long Island but has lived in the Washington, DC area most of his life. After taking a steel sculpture class at the University of Maryland, he left Architecture school and concentrated on Art full-time. He received an M.F.A. from Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2010, returning to the U.S. to marry his wife Elizabeth. During the day, Duffy teaches Art at Gonzaga College High School in Washington DC, a few blocks from the Capitol. At night he makes public sculptures and helps fabricate work for other artists.                                                                                                                                                         

-Matthew Duffy (Washington, D.C.)

Medium:  Aluminum, Diamond Plate, Enamel

‘Metamorphosis’

Mike Sohikian, of Genoa Ohio is a retired ironworker. His distinguished 34-year career as a structural iron worker earned him the nickname “Iron Mike” for his legendary capabilities in the field. As a full-time sculptor, he still approaches his artwork as an ironworker but advances with the artful eye of a fine artist. Both skill sets intersect when he uses the tools of his trade to bend, cut and shape steel by hand, creating one-of-a-kind expressive figurative work.

-Mike Sohikian (Genoa, Ohio)

Medium:  Steel and Concrete

 

‘Fleur a pois’

Fleur a Pois translated from French means “polka dot flower”.  The artist’s inspiration for this and other whimsical flowers she has created are from Dr. Seuss books and other illustrators in books she read to her class during her 34-year career in special education.  Ms. Reithmeier strives to make art that is fun and uplifting.  Fleur a Pois, her whimsical purple polka dot flower is both.   The flower is cut from steel, welded together and hand painted by the artist.

-Pamela Reithmeier (Monclova, Ohio)

Medium: Painted Steel

‘Questions’

“At an early age I was taught to observe the wonders of earth, sea, sky and humanity. I marveled at how earth and infinite space was possible and concluded that life could not possibly have come into existence from nothing. I was taught at an early age to enjoy making things by hand and with simple tools, not always the safest ones. This made up the majority of my childhood play time and led me to gravitate to art as my favorite adult vocation. The space between the two parts of the sculpture represents a passage through a life experience. As knowledge grows from experience, certain questions arise. Some questions are answered while others remain unanswered. The knowledge gathered from our questions and answers is central to who we are.”

-Robert Garcia (Whitehouse, Ohio)

Medium:  Mild steel and acrylic finish

'Flamenco Cactus'

The artist is well-known for reworking salvaged steel to new heights with his skill and artful ability to use his flame cutter the way a painter uses a paint brush to create effective allusions of softness and gracefulness in cold hard steel.
 
“My adventure into the arts has been exactly that, an adventure! I create art that simply put is visually appealing to me. Along with that aspect, the physical demand and challenges necessary to achieve my goals makes it a truly satisfying experience.” 
 

-Mike Sohikian (Genoa, Ohio)

Medium: Salvaged Steel, aluminum, concrete

‘Around the Gate’

“My sculpture is abstract, geometric, and organic shapes. I use the abstract manipulation of form in space to create visual balance, using rhythm, action and movement to combine and create compositions that convey the implied energy found in my work. The sculptures allude to an evolutionary process that we all share in our human experience. I associate this evolutionary process with the evolution of life experiences that we all commonly share. These ideas and concepts are what separate my work from the historical and industrial influences from which I draw my connections. The active forms that are brought together represent the flux of life, and embrace transformative concepts such as evolution, metamorphosis and transcendence.”

-Ray Katz (Pontiac, Michigan)

Medium:  Steel

2021-22 Perrysburg Sculpture Walk